Sunday, March 22, 2009

Africa Roots Vol. 4




I'll be out of town for a week and don't expect to be able to blog, but I wanted to get something in, so this one's a quickie.

I never managed to snag Vols. 1-3 of the legendary Africa Roots series, recorded at the Melkweg in Amsterdam in the early '80s. I did get hold of the fourth and final (?) installment, and what a wonderful recording it is!

Click on the picture below to read about the artists and the songs. The standout here is Mali's legendary Salif Keita along with the equally fabled Kante Manfila and Ousmane Kouyate, who deliver a scorching rendition of the Ambassadeurs classic "Primpin." Senegal's Baaba Maal, Algeria's Cheb Mami, Angola's Bonga and A.B. Crentsil from Ghana don't disappoint either with inspired renditions of some of their greatest songs. It's all good!

Listening to these tracks will take some of you back to the exciting days of the '80s when every day brought a new revelation for us African music fans and World Music™ had yet to be conceived. Enjoy!

Salif Keita & Les Ambassadeurs - Primpin

Baaba Maal & l'Orchestre - Dental

Baaba Maal & l'Orchestre - Yela

Baaba Maal & l'Orchestre - Lomtoro

Cheb Mami - Sanlou Ala Enabi

Bonga - Kua' Sanzala

Bonga - Camin Longe

A.B. Crentsil - Osokoo

A.B. Crentsil - Atia


A.B. Crentsil - Ahurusi




5 comments:

Steve Pile said...

Another awesome post! Thanks!

Anonymous said...

I love the tracks by Bonga, never heard of him until now.

benjamin said...

Bonga is the MAAAAAN!

If you're not too hostile to music made to make your hips move, check out Mulemba Xangola with Marisa Monte & Carlinhos Brown (BR):

http://www.esnips.com/doc/eb6203ce-2550-4bdc-90fe-5152fe15259e/Bonga,-Marisa-Monte--Carlinhos-Brown---Mulemba-Xangola

Or if you don't want to dance, check out Balumukeno, frickin beautiful:

http://www.ilike.com/artist/Bonga/album/Angola+72?src=onebox

Oh and hello Steve!

David said...

How often do you hear an album on which Baaba Maal's contribution is perhaps the least interesting?! Rare or unique - - but here's on where everyone else is so on fire, he seems to be in their shade (perhaps having his songs cut short didn't help!). Strong strong songs from Bonga & Crentsil, and a lovely rootsy one from Algeria, the best kind of rai! Fantastic album, this one is going round and round on my ipod for a bit! An enormous thank you for the post!

Sappa Lama Gomso said...

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